Caring for Someone with Alzheimer's

After the Diagnosis

Now that your family member or friend has received a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease, it’s important to learn as much as you can about the disease and how to care for someone who has it. You may also want to know the right way to share the news with family and friends.

Learning About Alzheimer’s

Sometimes, you may feel that you don't know how to care for the person with Alzheimer’s. This is a common feeling among caregivers of people with Alzheimer’s because each day may bring different challenges. Learning about the disease can help you understand and cope with these challenges. Here is some information about Alzheimer’s and ways you can learn more about it.

Alzheimer’s disease is an illness of the brain. It causes large numbers of nerve cells in the brain to die. This affects a person’s ability to remember things and think clearly. People with Alzheimer’s become forgetful and easily confused and may have a hard time concentrating. They may have trouble taking care of themselves and doing basic things like making meals, bathing, and getting dressed.

Alzheimer’s varies from person to person. It can progress faster in some people than in others, and not everyone will have the same symptoms. In general, though, Alzheimer’s takes many years to develop, becoming increasingly severe over time. As the disease gets worse, people need more help. Eventually, they require total care.

Alzheimer's disease consists of three main stages: mild (sometimes called early-stage), moderate, and severe (sometimes called late-stage). Understanding these stages can help you care for your loved one and plan ahead.

Mild Alzheimer’s Disease

In the mild stage of Alzheimer’s, people often have some memory loss and small changes in personality. They may have trouble remembering recent events or the names of familiar people or things. They may no longer be able to solve simple math problems or balance a checkbook. People with mild Alzheimer’s also slowly lose the ability to plan and organize. For example, they may have trouble making a grocery list and finding items in the store.

Moderate Alzheimer’s Disease

In the moderate stage of Alzheimer’s, memory loss and confusion become more obvious. People have more trouble organizing, planning, and following instructions. They may need help getting dressed and may start having problems with bladder or bowel control.

People with moderate Alzheimer’s may have trouble recognizing family members and friends. They may not know where they are or what day or year it is. They also may begin to wander, so they should not be left alone. Personality changes can become more serious. For example, people may make threats or accuse others of stealing.

Severe Alzheimer’s Disease

In the severe stage of Alzheimer's, people usually need help with all of their daily needs. They may not be able to walk or sit up without help. They may not be able to talk and often cannot recognize family members. They may have trouble swallowing and refuse to eat.

Learn More About Alzheimer’s Disease

So far, there is no cure for Alzheimer’s, but there are treatments that can prevent some symptoms from getting worse for a limited time. Here are some ways you can learn more about Alzheimer’s disease.