Depression

Psychotherapy

Several types of psychotherapy -- or "talk therapy" -- can help people with depression. Some treatments are short-term, lasting 10 to 20 weeks, and others are longer, depending on the person's needs.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT)

CBT can help an individual with depression change negative thinking. It can help you interpret your environment and interactions in a positive, realistic way. It may also help you recognize things that may be contributing to the depression and help you change behaviors that may be making the depression worse.

Interpersonal Therapy (IPT)

IPT is designed to help an individual understand and work through troubled relationships that may cause the depression or make it worse. When a behavior is causing problems, IPT may help you change the behavior. In IPT, you explore major issues that may add to your depression, such as grief, or times of upheaval or transition.

Problem-Solving Therapy (PST)

PST can improve an individual’s ability to cope with stressful life experiences. It is an effective treatment option, particularly for older adults with depression. Using a step-by-step process, you identify problems and come up with realistic solutions. It is a short-term therapy and may be conducted in an individual or group format.

For a list of helpful resources, visit the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH).