Long-Term Care

Facility-Based Services

Providing Full-Time Assistance

At some point, support from family, friends, and local programs may not be enough. People who require help full time might move to a residential facility that provides many or all of the long-term care services they need.

Facility-based long-term care services include

  • adult foster care
  • board and care homes
  • assisted living facilities
  • nursing homes
  • continuing care retirement communities.
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Some facilities have only housing and housekeeping, but many also provide personal care and medical services. Many facilities offer special programs for people with Alzheimer's disease and other types of dementia.

Board and Care Homes

Board and care homes, also called residential care facilities or group homes, are small private facilities, usually with 20 or fewer residents. Rooms may be private or shared. Residents receive personal care and meals and have staff available around the clock. Nursing and medical care usually are not provided on site.

Assisted Living

Assisted living is for people who need help with daily care, but not as much help as a nursing home provides. Assisted living facilities range in size from as few as 25 residents to 120 or more. Typically, a few "levels of care" are offered, with residents paying more for higher levels of care.

Assisted living residents usually live in their own apartments or rooms and share common areas. They have access to many services, including up to three meals a day; assistance with personal care; help with medications, housekeeping, and laundry; 24-hour supervision, security, and onsite staff; and social and recreational activities. Exact arrangements vary from state to state.

Learn more about assisted living, including what it costs.

Nursing Homes

Nursing homes, also called skilled nursing facilities, provide a wide range of health and personal care services. Their services focus on medical care more than most assisted living facilities. These services typically include nursing care, 24-hour supervision, three meals a day, and assistance with everyday activities. Rehabilitation services such as physical, occupational, and speech therapy are also available.

Some people stay at a nursing home for a short time after being in the hospital. After they recover, they go home. However, most nursing home residents live there permanently because they have ongoing physical or mental conditions that require constant care and supervision.

To look for and compare nursing homes in your area, see Medicare’s Nursing Home Compare.

Continuing Care Retirement Communities (CCRCs)

Continuing care retirement communities (CCRCs), also called life care communities, offer different levels of service in one location. Many of them offer independent housing (houses or apartments), assisted living, and skilled nursing care all on one campus. Health care services and recreation programs are also provided.

In a CCRC, where you live depends on the level of service you need. People who can no longer live independently move to the assisted living facility or sometimes receive home care in their independent living unit. If necessary, they can enter the CCRC's nursing home.

Get information, such as move-in requirements, about CCRCs.

Learn more about housing options for older adults, including owning, renting, living in a group setting or a nursing home.

For More Information

There are many sources of information about facility-based long-term care. A good place to start is the Eldercare Locator at 800-677-1116 or www.eldercare.gov. You can also call your local Area Agency on Aging, Aging and Disability Resource Center, department of human services or aging, or a social service agency.