Welcome To Module 1: Internet Basics

Helping Older Adults Search for Health Information Online

A Toolkit for Trainers from the National Institute on Aging

In this module, you will find

To teach the module, you will need

To get started, you should

Questions or comments about the Toolkit? Contact the National Institute on Aging at (301) 496-1752 or e-mail daileys@nia.nih.gov

Internet Basics: INTRODUCTION

Lesson Overview

Lesson Goals

In this lesson, students will:

  1. Learn basic computer terms.
  2. Practice using the mouse.
  3. Learn basic Internet terms.
  4. Learn how to get to a website.
  5. Learn how to explore a website.
  6. Learn how to use a search box.
  7. Learn how to use a site map.

Lesson Materials

In this lesson, students will need:

* This handout only includes computer and Internet terms relevant to this lesson. An alphabetical list of all glossary terms introduced in the nine Toolkit lessons is available online at www.nihseniorhealth.gov/toolkit.

Lesson Length

This lesson should last:

Approximately 2 hours and 20 minutes, with an optional stopping point at 80 minutes.

Lesson Preparation

Before the lesson, you should:

When you arrive in the classroom, you should:

You should also

Lesson Structure - Senior Friendly, Trainer Friendly

The senior-friendly lesson structure includes:

The trainer-friendly lesson plan features:

Lesson Structure - Senior Friendly, Trainer Friendly

About the Scripted Transition Boxes

[IMAGE: image of page with scripted transition box circled]

This lesson plan uses a combination of scripted and descriptive sections. The colored, scripted transition boxes which appear at the top of each page of the lesson plan are designed as "anchor points," marking the end of one part of the lesson and the start of another. It is important to convey the content in these transition boxes, although you may use your own wording as you become more familiar with the material. The steps that follow each scripted box are descriptive. Move through them according to your personal training style.
This approach is useful in maintaining lesson focus and keeping trainers and students on track. It also makes the lesson plan easy to use.

Important Note

In the discussions of health issues that may occur during class, refrain from offering medical advice or advocating specific treatments, physicians, hospitals, insurance plans, etc. Also, discourage this type of activity among students. Always emphasize that students should consult their health care providers about any medical information they may hear about in class or find on the Internet.

Icons Used in the Lesson Plan

Reaching The Older Student

To help your students grasp, apply, and retain the skills and information they are taught, be sure to:

These training techniques from the lesson can also help you be successful:

Internet Basics Lesson Plan

OPENING COMMENTS (5 Minutes)

"Welcome to Lesson 1: Internet Basics. My name is _________. (This is our classroom assistant_________.) Before we start the class, I'd like to review a few general points.";

Tell students the following:

1. This Lesson...

2. The website they will visit...

3. Please be aware that...

4. Housekeeping Issues...

5. Ask students if they have any questions.

INTRODUCTIONS (3 Minutes)

"Before we get started, let's introduce ourselves."

  1. Introduce yourself, giving your name and your experience teaching computers and the Internet. If you have a classroom assistant or peer coach, introduce that person.
  2. Ask students to give their names and tell whether they are at a beginning, intermediate, or advanced level with regard to their Internet experience.
  3. If time permits, ask each student to tell something about his or her background (family, work, travels, education...), why they decided to take this class, and what they hope to learn.

Purpose of Activity

CLASS PROCEDURES (3 Minutes)

"Let's talk for a moment about how the class will proceed. You will be learning new ways to use technology, and in order for everyone to be successful, here are some things we need to do."

Tell students the following:

1. To make sure everyone grasps the information and learns the skills...

2. As students, you should...

3. Ask students if they have any questions about class procedures.

Purpose of Activity

To communicate expectations, put students at ease, and facilitate learning.

LESSON GOALS (2 Minutes)

"In this lesson, we will learn some basic Internet skills in order to search for health information that is of interest to older adults.

Let's take a look at the specific goals for today's lesson."

Pass out Handout 1A: Lesson Goals.

1. Go over the handout with students.

Purpose of Activity

CORE ACTIVITY

COMPUTER TERMS (10 Minutes)

"Let's begin with Goal 1 - learning some basic computer terms.";

Pass out Handout 1B: Computer and Internet Terms

1. Go over these computer terms from Part I of the handout.

2. Ask students to point to the items at their computer stations.

PART I: COMPUTER TERMS

  1. computer
  2. keyboard
  3. monitor
  4. mouse
  5. mouse pad
  6. speakers
  7. hardware
  8. software

Tips for Glossary review

CORE ACTIVITY

MORE COMPUTER TERMS (5 Minutes)

"Let's continue with Goal 1 - learning some basic computer terms.";

Refer to Handout 1B: Computer and Internet Terms

1. Go over these terms from Part II of the handout.

2. Ask students to point to the items on their computer screen, where feasible.

PART II: MORE COMPUTER TERMS

  1. desktop
  2. icon
  3. cursor
  4. browser
  5. clicking

Tips for Glossary review

PRACTICE ACTIVITY

RIGHT AND LEFT CLICKING (15 Minutes)

"Let's go on to Goal 2 - practicing using the mouse. Let's begin by clicking with the mouse."

1. Make sure students' screens are set to their desktops.

Using your computer projector, demonstrate how to left-click on the mouse to open the browser icon. Then, ask students to do this on their screens.

2. Show students how to close the browser window by left-clicking on the top right X on the screen. Then have them do it at their screens.

3. Next, show students how to right-click on the browser icon and pull down to "Open"on the right click menu. Explain that right-clicking on the mouse opens a list of options, depending on what is clicked on the screen.

4. Give students time to practice right-and left-clicking the mouse.

Teaching Tips

SUMMARIZING (3 Minutes)

"Now let's take a look at the Goals to see what we've covered so far.";

Refer to Handout 1A: Lesson Goals.

1. Demonstrate and summarize the following learning objectives from Goals 1 and 2:

2. Ask students if they have any questions.

3. Ask students to check off Goals 1 and 2 on their handout.

TIME CHECK
45 minutes elapsed; about 1 hour, 35 minutes left.

Purpose of Activity

INTERNET TERMS (8 Minutes)

"Let's move on to Goal 3 - learning some basic Internet terms."

Refer to Handout 1B: Computer and Internet Terms

1. Go over these terms from Part III of the handout.

2. You may want to demonstrate these terms using your computer projector.

PART III: INTERNET TERMS

  1. the Internet
  2. the World Wide Web
  3. website
  4. home page
  5. link (or hyperlink)
  6. back arrow
  7. web address or URL
  8. address box

Tips for Glossary review

PRACTICE ACTIVITY

HOW TO GET TO A WEBSITE (10 Minutes)

"Let's move on to Goal 4 - learning how to get to a website."

  1. Point out the address box on the browser's home page. Tell students that typing in the website address into the address box and hitting the Enter key on the keyboard is one way to get to a website.
  2. Show students how to get to a website by typing in the address for the National Institute on Aging (NIA) website (www.nia.nih.gov) and hitting the Enter key.
  3. Ask students to type in the NIA web address on their computers and then hit Enter. Circulate to make sure that everyone is able to type in the address and get to the website.

Teaching Tips

PRACTICE ACTIVITY

EXPLORING A WEBSITE (15 Minutes)

"Let's explore the National Institute on Aging website."

  1. Point out these features of the NIA home page for students as they navigate with you:
    • Website name and purpose at the top
    • Links to various types of information
    • Top, side, and bottom menus
    • Back arrow (button)

  2. Tell students that on most web pages there is lots of information below the screen. Show them how to move the home page up and down by using the Page Up and Page Down keys.
  3. Choose a link and do a "shallow"search. Scroll down the page you come to, and return to the home page.
  4. Repeat the exercise while students navigate with you. Ask them to use the Page Up and Page Down keys to scan the page they find in the "shallow"search before returning to the home page. When everyone is adept at this technique, ask them how easy or how difficult it was for them to move back and forth on the site.

Doing a Shallow Search

SUMMARIZING (5 Minutes)

"Now let's take a look at the Goals again to see what we've accomplished so far.";

Refer to Handout 1A: Lesson Goals.

1. Demonstrate and summarize the following learning objectives from Goals 3, 4, and 5:

2. Ask students to check off Goals 3, 4, and 5 on their handout.

3. Ask students if they have any questions.

OPTIONAL STOPPING POINT

1 hour, 25 minutes elapsed; about 55 minutes left.

(If you choose to stop here, you may teach the remaining material in the next lesson.)

MORE INTERNET TERMS (5 Minutes)

"Let's learn a few more Internet terms."

Refer to Handout 1B: Computer and Internet Terms

  1. Go over these terms from Part IV of the handout.
  2. You may want to demonstrate these terms using your computer projector. Be sure to show students how to scroll and give them time to practice.

PART IV: MORE INTERNET TERMS

  1. button
  2. search box
  3. site map
  4. scroll
  5. scroll bar

Tips for Glossary review

USING A SEARCH BOX (20 Minutes)

"Let's look at Goal 6 - learning to use the Search Box. We will practice entering terms into the Search Box of the National Institute on Aging website."

  1. Read the scripted section in the box to the class, and make a list on a flip chart or board of the suggestions students have for Maria's search terms. Select one to try as a demonstration (osteoporosis prevention, for example). Type this term into your search box and ask your students to do the same. Show them how to left-click the blue search button to the right of the box.
  2. Ask students to left-click on the first article in the list that comes up on the search results page, and read the short article silently. They can practice scrolling or use the Page Up and Page Down buttons. Ask if they found responses to Maria's question, based on the information in the article.
  3. Show students how to use the back arrow to return to the search results page for "osteoporosis prevention."Point out to them that the right arrow is shaded back, meaning that it isn't "live."From this search results page, ask them to click on the back arrow to return to the NIA home page.

Maria's Mother

"Maria's mother is now three inches shorter at age 75 than she was at age 50. Maria, who is now 45, knows her mother suffers from osteoporosis, and wants to know if it's too late to prevent bone loss from happening to her. What search terms would you suggest Maria try on the NIA site to answer her question?"

SUMMARIZING (5 Minutes)

"Now let's take a look at the Goals to see what we've learned so far."

Refer to Handout 1A: Lesson Goals.

1. Demonstrate and summarize the following learning objectives from Goal 6:

2. Ask students if they have any questions.

3. Have students check off Goal 6 on their handout.

TIME CHECK
1 hour 50, minutes elapsed; about 30 minutes left.

EXPLORING A SITE MAP (10 Minutes)

"Let's take a look at Goal 7 - Learning to use a Site Map or site index. Most websites have a Site Map, which is a list of everything on the website. It's a shortcut way of finding out what's on a website."

  1. Demonstrate while students navigate with you. Show students how to locate the site map on the NIA site by scrolling to the link at the bottom of the home page. Demonstrate how to left-click on the site map link to go to the site map.
  2. Allow students a few minutes to scroll down the site map to see what's available on the NIA website. If time permits, encourage students to click on at least one link and do a "shallow" search to see what the site map provides access to. Doing a "shallow"search also gives students practice in clicking and using the back button.
  3. Hold a short discussion with students, asking them to compare the usefulness of the site map to the search box on the NIA home page. What are the advantages and disadvantages of each? Make a list on the board or flip chart as points are raised. Let students know that in future lessons you will be showing them even more ways to find information on websites.

Doing a Shallow Search

SUMMARIZING (5 Minutes)

"Now let's take a look at the Goals to see what we have accomplished so far.";

Refer to Handout 1A: Lesson Goals.

  1. Demonstrate and summarize the following learning objective from Goal 7:
    • Using the site map
  2. Ask students if they have any questions.
  3. Have students check off Goal 7 on their handout.
  4. Read through the seven the goals accomplished in the class and answer any remaining questions students may have.

CHECKING FOR UNDERSTANDING (5 Minutes)

"Let's review the major terms you learned today."

  1. From your computer projector, point to these items and ask students to name them. If necessary, refer them back to the definition on their handout.
    • desktop
    • icon
    • browser
    • cursor
    • URL or web address
    • link
    • scroll bar
    • back arrow (button)
    • search box
    • site map

  2. Ask students if they have any questions. Clear up any questions or concerns they may have.

WRAPPING UP (8 Minutes)

"In this lesson we have accomplished a number of goals. You have learned

  1. Some basic computer terms
  2. Some basic Internet terms
  3. How to use the mouse
  4. How to get to a website
  5. How to a explore a website
  6. How to use a search box
  7. how to use a site map

Remember, always check with your doctor or health care provider about health information you find on the Internet.

Here is your take home assignment, which will give you more practice with the skills you've learned today."

Pass out Handout 1C: Take Home Assignment.

  1. Read through each of the steps on the take-home assignment to familiarize students with the activity.
  2. If there is time, you may want to do this exercise in class. (It should take about 30 minutes.) Or, you can take students through the first few steps and then ask them to do the rest of the exercise on their own at home.
  3. Ask them to write down any questions or problems they have in the spaces provided and bring them to the next class.

END OF LESSON 1

INTERNET BASICS: HANDOUTS

HANDOUT 1A: Lesson Goals

During this lesson, you will:

___ Learn basic computer terms.
___ Practice using the mouse.
___ Learn basic Internet terms.
___ Learn how to get to a website.
___ Learn how to explore a website.
___ Learn how to use a search box.
___ Learn how to use a site map.

HANDOUT 1B: Computer and Internet Terms

PART I - Computer Terms

[IMAGE: Computer, monitor, speakers, keyboard, mouse, and mouse pad, all labeled]

  1. Computer or CPU (central processing unit)
    The main part, or "brains" of a computer. The CPU interprets and carries out program instructions.
  2. Keyboard
    The keys that operate the computer, very much like a typewriter, with extra keys for special functions.
  3. Monitor
    The part of a computer system that contains the computer screen, where information is displayed.
  4. Mouse
    A small hand-held device that controls the position of the cursor on the computer screen. Movements of the mouse correspond to movements of the cursor. (See Cursor in Part II.)
  5. Mouse Pad
    The pad on which you move the mouse.
  6. Speakers
    Devices that allow you to hear sound from the computer.
  7. Hardware
    The physical parts of a computer system.
  8. Software
    The instructions that tell the computer and computer networks what to do. Software is installed inside the computer.

    [IMAGE: Windows PC Desktop with icon identified]

  9. Desktop
    The information that appears on the computer soon after the computer is turned on. The desktop contains a number of icons, or images, that you can click on to start programs.
  10. Icon A small picture or image representing a command (such as print), a file, or a program. When you click on an icon, you start a command, open a file, or launch a program.
    • Cursor A small image on the screen indicating where you are pointing; the mouse controls the movements of the cursor. The cursor can appear in different forms, including:
    • An arrow, which indicates where you are positioned on the screen.
    • An I-beam, often blinking, which marks a place on the screen where you can enter or select text.
    • A pointing hand, which indicates that you are hovering over a link. (See Link in Part III.)
    • An hourglass, which indicates that the computer is doing a task. You must wait until it disappears before you can proceed.
  11. Browser
    Software, such as Microsoft Internet Explorer, used to find information on the Web. The most visible part of a browser sits at the top of the computer screen, above the web page.

    [IMAGE: Title, address, menu, and navigation bars in Internet Explorer]

  12. Clicking
    Pressing and releasing a button on a mouse to select or activate the area on the screen where the cursor is pointing. Usually, you click on the left side of the mouse (called a left click). For more advanced functions, you click on the right side of the mouse (called a right click).

    [IMAGE: hand on a computer mouse]

  13. The Internet
    A vast, international collection of computer networks that transfers information. A combination of the words international and network. Websites and e-mail are part of the Internet.
  14. The World Wide Web
    Also known as the Web, it is a system that lets you access information on the Internet. People often use the term Web to refer to the Internet, but they are not exactly the same thing. The World Wide Web operates over the Internet, and it is the most widely used part of the Internet.
  15. Website
    A location on the World Wide Web (and Internet) that contains information about a specific topic. A website usually contains multiple pages with different types of information about the topic.
  16. Home Page
    The first thing you see when you come to a website, or the opening page of a website. It provides information about the site and directs you to other pages on the site.

    [IMAGE: MedlinePlus and NIA home pages]

  17. Link (or hyperlink)
    A highlighted or underlined feature on a web page that, when clicked, will take you to another web page. A link most often appears as underlined words or an image.
  18. One sure way to tell if something is a link or not: Whenever your cursor turns into a pointing hand, the image or word you are pointing to is a link.

    [IMAGE: three images of a 'hand' cursor pointing at a hyperlink]

  19. Back Arrow
    This arrow, often green, is found at the top of most browsers. When you click on the back arrow, it takes you back - in order - through all of the web pages you've seen. (Sometimes called the back button.)

    [IMAGE: title, navigation, menu, and address bars in Internet Explorer with Back button highlighted]

  20. Web Addresss or URL
    The address for a website. (URL stands for Uniform Resource Locator.) U.S.-based web addresses usually start with the letters www (for World Wide Web) and end with a dot followed by letters that indicate the type of website it is:

    .com = commercial enterprise or business
    .org = non-profit organization
    .edu = educational institution
    .gov = government agency
    .mil = military agency
    .net = another ending for a commercial website

    On the Internet, you get to a website by typing in the web address (or URL) into the address box of the browser. For example, to get to the website of the National Institute on Aging (NIA), a Federal agency, you would type www.nia.nih.gov in the address box.

  21. Address Box
    A narrow, rectangular box in the browser window where you can type in a web address. Typing in the web address in the address box and hitting Enter on the keyboard will take you to a website.

    [IMAGE: Address Box and URL circled in screen shots of browser]

  22. Button
    A small box that looks like it's being depressed when you select it. Buttons can turn on (and turn off) many types of functions on the Internet.

    [IMAGE: Button 'Click for answer']

  23. Search Box
    A small rectangular blank space on a web page where you can type in a word or phrase to look for information. Clicking on the button next to the search box (or hitting the Enter key on the keyboard) will take you to a page where that information is located.

    [IMAGE: screenshot of MedlinePlus search box]

  24. Site Map
    A list of the contents on a website, similar to an index in a book. A link to the site map is usually found at the top or bottom of the home page.

    [IMAGE: screenshot of NIA Site Map]

  25. Scroll
    To move text or other information on a computer screen up, down, or sideways, with new information appearing as the old disappears.
  26. Scroll Bar
    A narrow, rectangular bar on the right edge and bottom edge of a web page that lets you move the page to see more of the information it contains. The scroll bar on the right moves the web page up and down, and the scroll bar on the bottom moves the web page right and left.

    [IMAGE: Horizontal and vertical scroll bars shown]

HANDOUT 1C: Take Home Assignment

Directions: Read Bill's story, then follow the steps below to go to the National Institute on Aging website to get information about forgetfulness. Use the images to guide you.

"Bill just turned 80, and lately he has seemed forgetful. He keeps misplacing his keys and forgetting people's names. His brother and sister died a few months ago, and since then he has been sad and moody. His wife has been asking herself if Bill's forgetfulness means he may have Alzheimer's, or if this is something that will pass."

  1. From the desktop, click on the icon for your browser. This will take you to your browser's home page on the Internet.
  2. From your browser's home page, locate the address box near the top of the page.
  3. Position your cursor over the address in the address box and click to highlight the address.
  4. Once the address is highlighted, delete it by hitting the Delete key (or the Backspace key) on your keyboard.

YOUR QUESTION(S)


  1. Type in the website address for the National Institute on Aging into the address box. The address is www.nia.nih.gov
  2. Hit the Enter button on your keyboard. The screen will change to the home page of the National Institute on Aging.

    YOUR QUESTION(S)


  3. Find the search box on the right hand side of the home page. Click inside the box with your mouse to clear the box of the words "Enter Search." Type in the term forgetfulness to search for information about this topic.
  4. Hit the Enter key on the keyboard. (Or click on the Search button next to the search box.)
  5. You should see a list of search results on the screen. Click on the first one. (The list changes frequently, so the first one on your list may be different from the one you see here.)
  6. Once you've clicked on the first item, read the page that appears. Use the Page Down key on your keyboard to move the screen down so you can see all the material on the page.

YOUR QUESTION(S)


  1. Write down one or two important pieces of information about forgetfulness that you think Bill's wife should know:

  2. When you've finished reading the material, click on the Back arrow at the top of the screen to return to the NIA home page.
  3. Click on the Back arrow again to return to your browser's home page.
  4. Click on the red X in the upper right hand corner to close the browser window and return to the desktop.

Did you have any trouble with any part of the exercise?
If so, make a list here, and bring it to the next class.

Last reviewed: November 2007