WELCOME TO MODULE 5: Exercise for Older Adults on NIHSeniorHealth and Go4Life®

BEGINNING & INTERMEDIATE STUDENTS

Helping Older Adults Search for Health Information Online

A Web Trainer’s Toolkit from the National Institute on Aging

This Module Includes:

  • A lesson plan for the trainer
  • Handouts for students:
    • practice activities
    • screen shots
    • illustrated glossary of Internet terms

Other Online Training Tools:

  • Making Your Computer Class Senior Friendly: A Checklist for Trainers
  • Video: The Toolkit: What Every Trainer Should Know

Classroom Equipment Needed

  • A PC with Internet access for each student
  • A computer projector with Internet access for the trainer and a screen

Module Storage for the Trainer

After printing out the materials, use a 3-ring binder to store:

  • lesson plans
  • copies of the handouts
  • Making Your Computer Class Senior Friendly: A Checklist for Trainers

Materials Storage for Students

Encourage students to use a 3-ring binder or a folder to store handouts.

Questions or comments about the Toolkit? Contact the National Institute on Aging at (301) 496-1752 or e-mail daileys@nia.nih.gov

Module 5 – Handouts: Exercise for Older Adults on NIHSeniorHealth and Go4Life®

Go to www.nihseniorhealth.gov and www.nia.nih.gov/go4life

This course for older adults was developed by the National Institute on Aging.

INTRODUCTION

Helping Older Adults Search for Health Information Online:

LESSON OVERVIEW

Lesson Goals

In this lesson, students will:

  • Recall how to use the Home Page and the Health Topics A-Z page of the NIHSeniorHealth website.
  • Recall how to use the special features (optional).
  • Learn about the benefits of exercise for older adults.
  • Learn about the Go4Life® website.
  • Learn about exercise safety for older adults.
  • Learn about suitable exercises for older adults and see them demonstrated.
  • Read stories by older adults who enjoy a variety of exercise activities.

Lesson Materials

In this lesson, students will need:

  • Handout 5A: Lesson Goals
  • Handout 5B: Glossary*
  • Handout 5C: Fred (Acts I, II, and III)
  • Handout 5D: Are You a “Fred”?
  • Handout 5E: Exploring Go4Life® Success Stories
  • Handout 5F: Lesson Review with Screen Shots
  • Pens or pencils

*This glossary only includes Internet terms relevant to this lesson. An alphabetical list of all glossary terms introduced in the nine Toolkit lessons is available online at www.nihseniorhealth.gov/toolkit.

Lesson Length

This lesson should last:

Approximately 2½ hours, with an optional stopping point at 1 hour, 15 minutes.

LESSON PREPARATION

Before the lesson, you should:

  • Read over the entire lesson plan. Also look at the Lesson Review with Screen Shots handout to get a quick overview of what students will learn.
  • Store the lesson plan in a 3-ring binder to use while teaching.
  • Make copies of the handouts for students. To avoid distraction, we recommend that you wait to distribute handouts until indicated in the lesson.
  • Check out the links that you and your students will be visiting in the lesson.

When you arrive in the classroom, you should:

  • Write your name and the title and level of the lesson on the board. [Searching for Health Information Online – Lesson 5: Exercise for Older Adults on NIHSeniorHealth and Go4Life® – Beginning and Intermediate Students]
  • Make sure your computer projector and students’ computers are working and that there is Internet access.
  • Set students’ screens to the NIHSeniorHealth home page at www.nihseniorhealth.gov.

You should also

  • Read Quick Tips for a Senior Friendly Computer Classroom at www.nihseniorhealth.gov/toolkit.
  • Watch the short video Introducing the Toolkit at www.nihseniorheatlh.gov/toolkit.

LESSON STRUCTURE – Senior Friendly, Trainer Friendly

The senior-friendly lesson structure includes:

  • Set-up activities to prepare students for learning.
  • Core activities to teach the website features and how to navigate to them.
  • Practice activities to let students apply web skills they have learned.
  • Reinforcement activities to summarize and reiterate the learning.

The trainer-friendly lesson plan features:

  • An easy-to-read layout.
  • Short, well-defined segments of teaching material per page.
  • Clearly marked, scripted transition boxes at the top of each page announcing the next learning point and ensuring a smooth transition between segments.
  • Suggested teaching times for each skill.
  • Time checks and optional stopping points, offering flexibility in total class length.
  • Helpful sidebars, providing teaching and navigation tips and describing the purpose for activities.
  • Meaningful icons.

Important Note

In the discussions of health issues that may occur during class, refrain from offering medical advice or advocating specific treatments, physicians, hospitals, insurance plans, etc. Also, discourage this type of activity among students. Always emphasize that students should consult their health care providers about any medical information they may hear about in class or find on the Internet.

REACHING THE OLDER STUDENT

To help your students grasp, apply, and retain the skills and information they are taught, be sure to:

  • Proceed slowly through the lesson. Some older adults will take longer than younger people to get the knack of using the Internet. If you move too quickly, they may not be able to keep up. They need time to practice and to absorb new information.
  • Circulate to make sure students are following you. Check students’ screens frequently to make sure they are not lost. If possible, arrange to have one or more classroom assistants work with students individually during the lesson.
  • Speak slowly and repeat information as often as necessary. Don’t make assumptions based on students’ age. They are learning new skills, and they will probably need to hear the information more than once to retain it.
  • Encourage questions. Pause frequently to ask if there are questions. After soliciting questions, allow at least 10 seconds for students to formulate them.
  • Create a senior-friendly environment. It is important to read Quick Tips for a Senior Friendly Computer Classroom for help on setting up the classroom to accommodate the needs of older adults.

These training techniques from the lesson can also help you be successful:

  • The use of scripted transition boxes to announce each new segment helps the class stay focused and on track.
  • Presenting material in small, well-defined steps makes it easier for students to grasp new skills and information.
  • Frequent summarizing and hands-on practice helps students retain what they’ve learned.
  • Handouts and printed screen shots help students understand and recall what is taught.
  • Group discussions and short dialogues help put students at ease.

LESSON PLAN

OPENING COMMENTS (5 Minutes)

SET-UP ACTIVITY

“Welcome to Lesson 5: Exercise for Older Adults on NIHSeniorHealth. (pronounced N-I-H Senior Health) and Go4Life® My name is _________. (This is our classroom assistant_________.) Before we start the class, I’d like to review a few general points.”

Tell students the following:

  • This Lesson...
    • Is intended for beginning students.
    • Is the fifth in a series of nine lessons developed by the National Institute on Aging to help older adults learn to find accurate online health information on their own.
  • The NIHSeniorHealth website they will visit...
    • Is sponsored by the National Institute on Aging and the National Library of Medicine, both part of the National Institutes of Health, or NIH.
    • NIH is part of the U.S. Government’s Department of Health and Human Services.
  • The Go4Life website they will visit is sponsored by the National Institute on Aging at NIH.
  • Housekeeping Issues...
    • Class will last about __minutes with stretch break(s) lasting ___minutes.
    • Bathroom breaks can be taken anytime. Restrooms are located______.
  • Ask students if they have any questions.

INTRODUCTIONS (3 Minutes)

SET-UP ACTIVITY

“Before we get started, let’s introduce ourselves.”

  • Introduce yourself, giving your name and your experience teaching computers and the Internet. If you have a classroom assistant or peer coach, introduce that person.
  • Ask students to give their names and tell whether they are at a beginning, intermediate, or advanced level with regard to their Internet experience.
  • If time permits, ask each student to tell something about his or her background (family, work, travels, education...), why they decided to take this class, and what they hope to learn.

Purpose of Activity

  • Introductions help students feel more at ease.
  • Sharing computer or Internet experience may help the class be patient with less experienced students who need more time with an activity.

CLASS PROCEDURES (3 Minutes)

SET-UP ACTIVITY

“Let’s talk for a moment about how the class will proceed. You will be learning new ways to use technology, and in order for everyone to be successful, here are some things we need to do.”

Tell students the following:

  • To make sure everyone grasps the information and learns the skills...
    • We will proceed in a step-by-step manner and at a slow-to-moderate pace.
    • I (or my assistant) will circulate frequently during class to make sure everyone is keeping up with the lesson.
    • There will be plenty of hands-on practice activities to let you apply the skills that you learn.
    • There will be plenty of handouts to help you learn the skills while in class and to use as a reference once you leave class.
  • As students, you should...
    • Feel free to raise your hand and ask a question if you do not understand something.
    • Feel free to ask me to repeat anything I’ve said.
    • Not worry about hurting the equipment because it is very sturdy.
    • Not worry about making mistakes because that is to be expected when learning a new technology.
    • Have a binder or folder to store the handouts you will receive.
  • Ask students if they have any questions about class procedures.

Purpose of Activity

  • To communicate expectations, put students at ease, and facilitate learning.

TAKE-HOME ASSIGNMENT (5 Minutes)

REINFORCEMENT ACTIVITY

“Before we get started with the new material, let’s go over the take-home assignment from the last class.”

  • Restate the take-home assignment from Module 4.
    • Completing one or more activities on Handout 4H: Using the FAQs, Site Map or Search Box.
  • Pair students up and have them share what they learned. Then have each pair share some of their conversation with the class. (Class Discussion)
  • Ask students to share any problems they had navigating NIHSeniorHealth or finding the information they were searching for. Respond to their questions.

Note

  • This activity assumes use of the previous module. If you did not teach that module, you can skip this activity.

Purpose of Activity

  • Let’s you see how well students understood the previous lesson.
  • Serves as a kind of icebreaker, promoting interactivity and discussion early in the class.
  • Let’s you see what you might need to emphasize in the first parts of this lesson.

LESSON GOALS (2 Minutes)

SET-UP ACTIVITY

“In this lesson we will learn about exercise and older adults. Let’s take a look at the specific goals for today’s lesson.”

Pass out Handout 5A: Lesson Goals.

  • Go over the handout with students.

Purpose of Activity

  • Focuses students on what they will learn.
  • Introduces goals that you can return to throughout the lesson.

INTERNET TERMS (5 Minutes)

SET-UP ACTIVITY

“Before we actually get into the heart of the lesson, let’s review a few basic Internet terms.”

Pass out Handout 5B: Glossary

  • Knowing the meaning of these Internet terms will help students understand the lesson. In addition to reviewing new terms (marked with ***), you may wish to go over terms from this list that were introduced in previous lessons to help students recall their meaning.
  • You may want to demonstrate the terms for students from your computer projector.

INTERNET TERMS

  • back arrow
  • button
  • drop down menu***
  • FAQs
  • link (or hyperlink)
  • menu
  • scroll
  • scroll bar
  • site map

Tips for Glossary Review

  • Refer students to the page and item number of the term.
  • Make sure students locate the term.
  • Read, or have a student read, the definition aloud. Point out details in the illustration or on your computer screen.
  • Tell students they will understand these terms better as they use them in the lesson.

REVIEW: THE HOME PAGE (5 Minutes)

SET-UP ACTIVITY

“Let’s start with Goal 1 – reviewing how to use the Home Page and the Health Topics A-Z page on the NIHSeniorHealth website.”

  • Students’ screens should be set on the Home Page of NIHSeniorHealth at www.nihseniorhealth.gov.
  • Recall and point out for students:
    • The purpose of the site (for adults 60 and older)
    • The alphabetical list of health topics
    • The categories of health topics
    • The Health Topics A-Z link
  • Point out that they can use the Health Topics A-Z link at the top of each page to locate all of the health topics on the website
  • Demonstrate as students navigate with you.
  • Show students how clicking on the Health Topics A-Z link takes them to the Health Topics A-Z page.
  • Scroll down the Health Topics A-Z page to reveal the health topics, arranged alphabetically.
  • Ask students if they have any questions.
  • Return to the Home Page.

REVIEW: THE SPECIAL FEATURES (5 Minutes)

SET-UP ACTIVITY

“Now, for Goal 3. You will recall that NIHSeniorHealth has special features to make the information on the website easier for older adults to grasp. These features let you change the size of the text and change the color contrast of the page. The buttons for these features are found at the top of each page.”

  • Text Size
    • Demonstrate as students navigate with you.
    • Enlarge the text using the text size button. Let students set the text at the size they prefer. They can switch back to the normal (default) text size if they like.
  • Contrast
    • Demonstrate as students navigate with you.
    • Change the contrast using the contrast button. Students can switch back to the normal (default) colors if they like.

SUMMARIZING (2 Minutes)

REINFORCEMENT ACTIVITY

“Now let’s take a look at the Lesson Goals to see what we have accomplished so far.”

Refer to Handout 5A: Lesson Goals.

  • Demonstrate and summarize the following learning objectives from Goals 1 and 2:
    • Using the Home Page and the Health Topics A-Z link
    • Using the special features ( if presented)
  • Ask students if they have any questions.
  • Ask students to check off Goals 1 and 2 on their handout.

TIME CHECK: 35 minutes elapsed; 1 hour, 50 minutes left.

Purpose of Activity

  • Lets students know what they should have grasped by this point in the lesson.
  • Gives students another chance to ask questions about material already covered.
  • Lets you see what goals might need further explanation.
  • Gives students a sense of accomplishment.
  • Keeps the class on track.

BENEFITS OF EXERCISE (15 Minutes)

CORE ACTIVITY

“Let’s move on to Goal 3 – learning about the benefits of exercise for older adults. First, we’ll take a look at one older man’s view of exercise.”

Pass out Handout 5C: Fred.

  • Read the opening paragraphs of Act I: Fred’s Golden Years to the class. Select two students to read the parts of Fred and his daughter, Janet.
  • When the students have finished reading the dialogue, ask the class what reasons Fred gave for not exercising. Write their responses on the blackboard or on a flip chart.
    • Fred’s reasons for not exercising (Input from Students):
      • He needs to relax.
      • Exercise will not make a difference.
      • You have to work too hard.
      • Exercise is for younger people.
  • Demonstrate while students navigate with you. From the Home Page, click on the letter “E”. This will take you to the Health Topics A-Z page where the health topics beginning with “E” are located.
  • Click on Exercise: Benefits of Exercise. Ask 2 students to read the first and second paragraphs on the page aloud.
  • Click on and watch the video “Why It’s Important for Older Adults to Exercise”.
  • Ask students to read the rest of the page silently. They should find and write down two facts that might encourage Fred to think differently about exercise
  • Ask students to share the two facts they found with the class. (Class Discussion)

SUMMARIZING (2 Minutes)

REINFORCEMENT ACTIVITY

“Now let’s take a look at the Lesson Goals to see what we have accomplished so far.”

Refer to Handout 5A: Lesson Goals.

  • Demonstrate and summarize the following learning objectives from Goals 3:
    • Learning about the benefits of exercise for older adults.
    • Ask students if they have any questions.
    • Ask students to check off Goals 3 on their handout.

Purpose of Activity

  • Lets students know what they should have grasped by this point in the lesson.
  • Gives students another chance to ask questions about material already covered.
  • Lets you see what goals might need further explanation.
  • Gives students a sense of accomplishment.
  • Keeps the class on track.

EXERCISE AND YOU (10 Minutes)

CORE ACTIVITY

“Take a moment to reflect on your own experience with exercise.”

Pass out Handout 5D: Are You a “Fred”?

  • Have students complete the handout. Then, put students in groups of 2 or 3 and have them discuss their responses and whether Fred’s reasons for not exercising apply to them.
  • Ask students to share with the class the two questions they have about exercise.
  • Ask students to put the handout aside. They will return to it later.

LEARNING ABOUT GO4LIFE® (10 Minutes)

CORE ACTIVITY

“Now for Goal 4. Let’s take a look at another website devoted entirely to exercise and physical activity for older adults — Go4Life®. This website is the centerpiece of an ongoing national campaign by the National Institute on Aging (NIA) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to promote exercise and physical activity in older adults.

  • Demonstrate as students navigate with you.
  • From the page on “Health Benefits,” go to the Left Menu and under the “Learn More” section, click on National Institute on Aging.
  • A window will open to the website for the National Institute on Aging (NIA). Go to the top of the page of the NIA website and click on the link to Go4Life®.
  • Point out the features on the Go4Life® Home Page:
    • The links on the right menu (“Get Started Today”, etc)
    • The links on the top of the page (“Get Started,” “Stay Active”, etc.)
    • What’s New
    • The latest tweets
    • A free booklet, “Workout To Go”
    • Success Stories

SAFETY FIRST (15 Minutes)

CORE ACTIVITY

“Let’s move on to Goal 5– learning about exercise safety for older adults. First, let’s see what’s happening with Fred.”

Refer students to Handout 5C: Fred.

  • Read aloud (or have students read silently) Act II: Fred Tries Exercise.
  • Ask the class for their thoughts on Fred’s attempt at exercise.
  • On the Home Page of the Go4Life® website, ask students to click on the Get Started link at the top of the page and then move down the drop down list to click on Stay Safe.
  • Ask students to read the “Stay Safe” page. (If they need to enlarge the type, they can click on the + sign next to the Text Size button in the upper right hand corner of the page.)
  • If there is time, ask them to choose a link on the right under “Printable Tools & Tips” and click on it to read more about exercise safety. (These documents are in pdf format. Be sure to show students how to exit the pdf by clicking on the back button.)
  • Ask the class what they learned about safety and exercise. Also ask if they read any information that could help Fred. (Answer: Checking with his doctor before trying vigorous activity.) (Class Discussion)

Teaching Tip

Proceed slowly through the exercise. Make sure each student is keeping up.

SUMMARIZING (2 Minutes)

REINFORCEMENT ACTIVITY

“Now let’s take a look at the Lesson Goals to see what we’ve accomplished so far.”

Refer to Handout 5A: Lesson Goals.

  • Demonstrate and summarize the following learning objectives from Goals 4 and 5:
    • Learning about the Go4Life® website
    • Learning about exercise safety for older adults
  • Ask students if they have any questions.
  • Ask students to check off Goals 4 and 5 on their handout.

OPTIONAL STOPPING POINT: One hour, 15 minutes elapsed; about 1 hour, 15 minutes left. (If you choose to stop here, you may teach the remaining material in the next lesson).

Purpose of Activity

  • Lets students know what they should have grasped by this point in the lesson.
  • Gives students another chance to ask questions about material already covered.
  • Lets you see what goals might need further explanation.
  • Gives students a sense of accomplishment.
  • Keeps the class on track.

EXERCISES TO TRY (20 Minutes)

CORE ACTIVITY

“Let’s go to Goal 6 – learning about suitable exercises for older adults and seeing them demonstrated. We’ll visit a place on the Go4Life® website that shows you how to do exercises correctly.”

  • Demonstrate while students navigate with you. On the “Stay Safe” page of the Go4Life® website, go to the Left Menu and click on 4 types of Exercise.
  • Read, or have a student read, the first paragraph describing the 4 types of exercises older adults should do (endurance, strength, balance, and flexibility).
  • Ask students to scroll down the page, reading more about each type of exercise.
  • To see examples of exercises, have students scroll back to the top of the page and click on the Stay Active link. In the drop down box, ask them to click on Try These Exercises.
  • Scroll down to the Strength Exercises section and click on Overhead Arm Raise. Let students read the information next to the photo. They can scroll down to play the video showing the exercise being performed.
  • Tell students to click on the Back to all Exercises button on the upper right side of this window.
  • Ask them to click on 1 or 2 exercises they would like to see or see demonstrated. [NOTE: Endurance exercises are only seen where there is a video icon. Not all exercises in the other 3 sections have an accompanying video.]
  • Briefly discuss what students found out about the different types of exercises. (Class Discussion)

SUMMARIZING (3 Minutes)

REINFORCEMENT ACTIVITY

“Now let’s take a look at the Lesson Goals to see what we’ve accomplished so far.”

Refer to Handout 5A: Lesson Goals.

  • Demonstrate and summarize the following learning objectives from Goal 6:
    • Reading about suitable exercises for older adults
    • Seeing the exercises demonstrated
  • Ask students if they have any questions.
  • Ask students to check off Goal 6 on their handout.

TIME CHECK: 1 hour 50 minutes elapsed; about 42 minutes left.

Purpose of Activity

  • Lets students know what they should have grasped by this point in the lesson.
  • Gives students another chance to ask questions about material already covered.
  • Lets you see what goals might need further explanation.
  • Gives students a sense of accomplishment.
  • Keeps the class on track.

SUCCESS STORIES (15 Minutes)

CORE ACTIVITY

“Finally, let’s take a look at Goal 7 – reading stories by older adults who enjoy a variety of exercise activities.”

  • Have students click on the Stay Active link at the top of the page and then, in the drop down box, click on See Success Stories.
  • Read, or have a student read the beginning paragraph of the featured Success Story. Have students click on Read full story to finish reading the story silently.
  • Direct students to the left menu and ask them to click on Success Stories Home.
  • In the center of the page, point out the tabs with four categories of Success Stories:
    • First Timers
    • Busy Lifestyle
    • Health Issues
    • Just for Fun
  • Ask them to click on a Success Story category of interest to them and choose a story to read on their own.
  • Ask students what they thought of the stories, and whether they were motivated by them. (Short Discussion)

Teaching Tip

Walk around to students’ computers and assist them with the exercise if necessary.

SUMMARIZING (2 Minutes)

REINFORCEMENT ACTIVITY

“Now let’s take a look at the Lesson Goals to see what we’ve accomplished so far.”

Refer students back to Handout 5A: Lesson Goals.

  • Demonstrate and summarize the following learning objectives from Goal 7:
    • Navigating Success Stories.
    • Reading stories by older adults who enjoy a variety of exercise activities.
  • Ask students if they have any questions.
  • Ask students to check off Goal 7 on their handout.

Purpose of Activity

  • Lets students know what they should have grasped by this point in the lesson.
  • Gives students another chance to ask questions about material already covered.
  • Lets you see what goals might need further explanation.
  • Gives students a sense of accomplishment.
  • Keeps the class on track.

EXERCISE, FRED, AND YOU, REVISITED (10 Minutes)

REINFORCEMENT ACTIVITY

“Now let’s re-visit Fred and see what has happened with him.”

Refer to Handout 5C: Fred.

  • Read, or have selected students read, the opening paragraphs of Act III: Fred’s Exercise Program to the class. Select two other students to read the parts of Fred and his daughter, Janet.
  • Ask the class for their thoughts on Fred’s exercise program.

Refer students to Handout 5D: Are You a “Fred”?

  • Ask students to look at the two most important questions they had about exercise and see if their questions have been answered. Ask them if the lesson has caused them to think differently about exercise and physical activity. (Class Discussion)
  • Go over the main navigation links at the top of the Go4Life® website, revealing what is available in the drop down boxes.
  • Under Resources, have them click on Go4Life Tip Sheets and scan the list of available Tip Sheets.
  • Allow students a few minutes to explore the website on their own.

Teaching Tip

Walk around to students’ computers and assist them with the exercise if necessary.

WRAPPING UP (10 Minutes)

REINFORCEMENT ACTIVITY

“In this lesson, you’ve done online research about exercise and older adults. You have

  • Recalled how to use the Home Page and the Health Topics A-Z page of NIHSeniorHealth.
  • Recalled how to use the special features (optional).
  • Learned about the benefits of exercise for older adults.
  • Learned about the Go4Life® website.
  • Learned about exercise safety and older adults.
  • Learned about suitable exercises for older adults and saw them demonstrated.
  • Read stories about older adults who enjoy a variety of exercise activities.

Here is a handout to help you recall what you learned.

Pass out Handout 5F: Lesson Review with Screen Shots.

  • Read the cover description, How to Use This Handout, to students.
  • Go over each screen shot, reading the captions to remind students of the navigation steps they learned on each page. (You do not need to refer back to the computer screen at this point.)
  • Encourage students to use this handout as a reference when practicing the skills they learned in this lesson.

Purpose of Activity

  • Summarizes all of the skills taught in the lesson.
  • Handout gives students a visual map of the lesson to remind them of the web pages visited and the skills learned.

TAKE-HOME ASSIGNMENT (5 Minutes)

REINFORCEMENT ACTIVITY

“Remember, always check with your doctor or health care provider about health information you find on the Internet.

Also, check with your doctor or health care provider before beginning any exercise program.

Here’s your take-home assignment, which will give you more practice with the skills you’ve learned today.”

  • Offer students one of two possible take-home assignments. Students can:
    • Complete the appropriate activity on Handout 5E. (Go over the handout with students.)
    • Write their own Success Story and submit it for posting on Go4Life®.(Click on Stay in Touch on the top menu,and then click on Share Your Story in the drop down box.)This is an advanced exercise, which only experienced students will be able to do without assistance.
  • Ask students the names of the two websites visited in this lesson: Answer: NIHSeniorHealth and Go4Life®
  • Remind them that the addresses of the websites can be found at the bottom of their handouts.

END OF LESSON 5

HANDOUTS

HANDOUT 5A: Lesson Goals

During this lesson, you will:

  • Recall how to use the Home Page and the Health Topics A-Z page of the NIHSeniorHealth website.
  • Recall how to use the special features (optional).
  • Learn about the benefits of exercise for older adults.
  • Learn about the Go4Life® website.
  • Learn about exercise safety for older adults.
  • Learn about suitable exercises for older adults and see them demonstrated.
  • Read stories by older adults who enjoy a variety of exercise activities.

HANDOUT 5B: Glossary

  • Back arrow: This arrow is found at the top of most browsers. When you click on the back arrow, it takes you back – in order – through all of the web pages you have seen. (Sometimes called the back button.)
  • Button: Small box that looks like it’s being depressed when you select it. Buttons can turn on (and turn off) many types of functions on the Internet.
  • Drop Down Menu: This is a menu whose full contents are revealed when you mouse over it. The contents – which are actually links – “drop down” below the menu and remain visible until one of the links is clicked on.
  • FAQs: Stands for Frequently Asked Questions. These are commonly asked questions and answers that appear on many websites. Clicking on the question reveals the answer.
  • Link (or hyperlink): A highlighted or underlined feature on a web page that, when clicked, will take you to another web page. A link most often appears as underlined words or an image. One sure way to tell if something is a link or not: Whenever your cursor turns into a pointing hand, the image or word you are pointing to is a link.
  • Menu: A list of options, or topics, on a website that users can choose from.
  • Scroll: To move text or other information on a computer screen up, down, or sideways, with new information appearing as the old disappears.
  • Scroll Bar: A narrow, rectangular bar on the right edge and bottom edge of a web page that lets you move the page to see more of the information it contains. The scroll bar on the right moves the web page up and down, and the scroll bar on the bottom moves the web page right and left.
  • Site Map: A list of all of the contents on a website, similar to an index in a book. A link to the site map is usually found at the top or bottom of the home page.

HANDOUT 5C: Fred

ACT I: Fred’s Golden Years

Fred is 64 years old and just retired last year. He takes medication for high blood pressure and also weighs about 20 pounds more than he should. (It seems like those pounds just crept up overnight!)

As an adult, he has never been that physically active. When he was a boy, he played sports, but then let it all go when he got older. He earned his living as a salesman, often traveling for the job. Between work and family, there never seemed to be enough time for “extras” like exercise. Besides, no one ever told him he should exercise.

Recently, his daughter suggested that he look into getting more exercise...

Janet: Dad, I’ve heard lots of reports in the news recently about exercise being valuable for older people. Have you ever thought of trying it out?

Fred: Naw... That’s not for me.

Janet: Why not?

Fred: Hey, I’ve worked hard all my life. These are my “golden years”. Now’s the time to relax.

Janet: But they say that exercise can help keep you fit and in shape. It can help keep your “golden years” golden.

Fred: No, you have to work too hard. Plus what difference would it make at this point in life?

Janet: Well, it would help keep your muscles strong for lifting things, and you wouldn’t get out of breath so easily when you go up the stairs.

Fred: Hey, I can lift the things I need to lift just fine. Anyway, as you get older, it’s normal to be out of breath after taking the stairs.

Janet: But Dad –

Fred: No. That exercise stuff is really for younger people. They have the energy for it, and they’re healthy enough to do it.

ACT II: Fred Tries Exercise

After thinking over what his daughter said, Fred decided to try exercising. But he figured that if he was going to exercise, he should go all out. As a salesman, he never believed in doing things half way. Going for the gold was the only way to guarantee success. After all, if he didn’t work super hard, how would he see any changes?

So, he signed up at the local community center and began by lifting very heavy weights and running on the treadmill. He also tried the circuit training – leg lifts, bench presses, etc. The next day, he was so sore that he swore he’d never go back. He spent the entire day in bed recuperating, telling himself that this exercise business was for the birds. He’d had enough!

ACT III: Fred’s Exercise Program

At his last physical, Fred’s doctor suggested that he get some regular exercise. Fred told his doctor what had happened when he had tried to exercise before. All that effort and energy left him feeling terrible afterwards!

His doctor suggested that he start out slowly, doing a little at a time, and gradually building up. He suggested walking and investing in some light hand weights that Fred could lift at home. He also suggested going online to the Go4Life® website at http://go4life.nia.nih.gov/ and the NIHSeniorHealth website at www.nihseniorhealth.gov and reading the information on exercise for older adults.

When he got home, Fred went online and visited Go4Life® and NIHSeniorHealth. On Go4Life®, he came across the section on Success Stories, where older adults describe how they exercise, and he found them very inspiring.

Fred gave exercise another try, this time starting out slowly, but being consistent. After a few weeks, he started seeing results...

Janet: Hi Dad. I called you earlier but no one answered.

Fred: Oh yeah. I walked to the store.

Janet: You walked? Why didn’t you drive?

Fred: Oh, it’s a way to get more exercise. The doctor told me to try it, so I’m trying it.

Janet: How much walking are you doing?

Fred: Well, I take a 30-minute walk a couple of days a week and, like I said, I walk to the store. I also walk over to Bob and Mary’s house around the block.

Janet: Wow!

Fred: I also picked up a couple of weights at the store, and I lift ‘em every other day.

Janet: Hmmm. Sounds good. Are you having fun?

Fred: Fun? I don’t know. But I do feel better, and I have more energy.

Janet: Sounds like exercise is paying off.

Fred: Yeah, I guess it is. And it isn’t nearly as tough as I thought it would be. Doesn’t hurt either. Sometimes it’s hard to stick with it, though.

Janet: Yeah, I know. Well, at least you’ve gotten started. That’s the main thing.

Fred: Hey, maybe you’d like to come with me sometime.

Janet: That’s a great idea! That way, we could keep each other company and make sure we BOTH stick with it.

HANDOUT 5D: Are You a “Fred”?

Take this survey to find out. Strongly

Strongly Agree = 1 and Strongly Disagree = 5

  • I never exercise. 1 2 3 4 5
  • I tried exercise, but I gave up. 1 2 3 4 5
  • I tried exercise, but I overdid it and had to stop. 1 2 3 4 5
  • I want to exercise, but I don’t know how to begin. 1 2 3 4 5
  • I want to exercise, but I’m afraid I’ll get hurt. 1 2 3 4 5
  • I exercise now and then. 1 2 3 4 5
  • I exercise regularly. 1 2 3 4 5

What are two important questions you have about exercise?

Question 1:

Question 2:

HANDOUT 5E: Exploring the Go4Life® Success Stories

Directions: Complete Activity One if you are thinking of becoming more physically active.

Activity One

  • Go to the Go4Life® website at www.go4life.nia.nih.gov.
  • On the right side of the page, click on www.nia.nih.gov/go4life.
  • Under the middle column, “Get Set”, click on Find Your Starting Point and read the information there.
    • Jot down one piece of helpful information you found.
  • In the right column, under “Printable Tools and Tips,” choose a link to click on and read it for more information.
    • Jot down one piece of helpful information you found. (Use the back button in the upper left hand corner of the screen to exit the pdf document and return to the web page.)
  • In the Left Menu, click on Set Your Goals and read about the next steps in becoming more active.
    • Jot down one piece of helpful information you found.
  • In the Left Menu, click on the picture, See Success Stories. Then click on “First Timers” and read a story of a first-time exerciser.
    • Jot down one piece of helpful information you found.

HANDOUT 5E: Exploring the Go4Life® Success Stories

Directions: Complete if you are already involved in regular exercise and want to remain active or challenge yourself more.

Activity Two

  • Go to the Go4Life® website at www.nia.nih.gov/go4life.
  • On the top menu, click on Stay Active.
  • A drop down menu will appear with several links. Click on Keep Going. Read the information on the page you come to.
    • Jot down one piece of helpful information you found.
  • Return to the top menu and click on Stay Active. When the drop down menu appears, click on How Are You Doing? Read the information on the page you come to.
    • Jot down one piece of helpful information you found.
  • In the right column of the “How Are You Doing?” page, choose a link under “Printable Tools and Tips” and click on it. Read it for more information.
    • Jot down one piece of helpful information you found. (Use the back button in the upper left hand corner of the screen to exit the pdf document and return to the web page.)
  • On the Left Menu, click on See Success Stories. Then click on the Busy Lifestyle link and choose a success story to read.
    • Jot down one piece of helpful information you found.

HANDOUT 5F: Lesson Review with Screen Shots

How to Use this Handout

  • Use this handout to help you review the lesson.
  • The screen shots (pictures of web pages) will help you recall the places you visited inclass, and the descriptions will remind you of the navigation skills you learned.
  • You may wish to refer to this handout when searching the website you visited in class.
  • If you have questions about how to navigate any of these pages, write your questions inthe spaces provided and bring them to the next class.

HANDOUT 5F: Screen Shots Exercise for Older Adults on NIHSeniorHealth and Go4Life®

  • You went to the NIHSeniorHealth website at www.nihseniorhealth.gov (See Screen Shot 1: Home Page).  On the Home Page, you  earned that health topics are organized by:
    • first letter of the alphabet and
    • by category
  • You recalled how to use the Health Topics A-Z link located at the top of every page. Clicking on the Health Topics A-Z link always leads you to this page, where you can find a list of all of the topics on the website, organized alphabetically (See Screen Shot 2: Health Topics A-Z Page).
  • Optional Activity – You recalled how to use the Special Features, located at the top of each page (See Screen Shot 3: Special Features).
    • To make the text larger, click one of the “A’s” on the Resize Text button.
    • To increase the color contrast, click on the Change Contrast button.
  • On the Health Topics A-Z page, you scrolled down to the list of health topics beginning with the letter “E” and clicked on “Exercise: Benefits of Exercise.” (See Screen Shot 4: List of Links to Health Topics)
  • When reading about the benefits of exercise for older adults, you also clicked on a video, “Why It’s Important for Older Adults to Exercise,” and watched it (See Screen Shot 5: Benefits of Exercise Topic).
  • You went to the Left menu and clicked on the link to the website of on Aging Website the National Institute on Aging (See Screen Shot 6: Link to National Institute on Aging Website).
  • On the website for the National Institute on Aging (NIA), you went to the top of the page and clicked on the link to Go4Life®, the exercise and physical activity campaign for older adults from NIA (See Screen Shot 7: Home Page of the National Institute on Aging at NIH).
  • On the Go4Life® home page, you learned Home Page about the features of this website, including (See Screen Shot 8: Go4Life® Home Page):
    • The links at the top
    • The links on the right menu
    • The latest tweets
    • The “What’s New” section
    • “Workout To Go”, a free booklet
  • On the top menu you clicked on Get Started and a drop down menu and Drop Down menu opened, displaying a list of links. You moved your mouse down the list and clicked on Stay Safe (See Screen Shot 9: "Get Started" Link and Drop Down Menu).
  • On the Stay Safe page, you read about exercise safety for older adults. You also clicked on a Tip Sheet on the right for more safety information (See Screen Shot 10: Stay Safe Page).
  • On the left menu, you clicked on 4 Types of Exercise and came to a page describing endurance, strength, flexibility, and balance exercises (See Screen Shot 11: Four (4) types of Exercise).
  • On the top menu, you clicked on Stay Active, which opened up a drop down menu. On the drop down menu, you clicked on Try These Exercises. You came to a page where you could see the exercises demonstrated (See Screen Shot 12: "Stay Active" Link and Drop Down Menu).
  • On the Try These exercises page, you scrolled down to “Strength Exercises” and clicked on Overhead Arm Raise (See Screen Shot 13: Images of Strength Exercises).
  • On the Overhead Arm Raise page, you saw an image and read a description of how to do an overhead arm raise correctly. You also watched a video of a woman doing overhead arm raises. You clicked on Back to all Exercises to find more exercises (See Screen Shot 14: Overhead Arm Raise Page).
  • At the top of the Overhead Arm Raise page, you clicked on the Stay Active link and when the drop down menu appeared, you clicked on See Success Stories. You came to this page, featuring exercise success stories from older adults. After reading the introductory paragraph for one story, you clicked on Read Full Story for more (See Screen Shot 15: Success Stories Page).
  • You clicked on the Resources link at the top of the page and when the drop down menu opened, you clicked on Go4Life Tips Sheets. This took to the list of Tip Sheets and you clicked on one of them to read the information (See Screen Shot 16: List of Tip Sheets and Screen Shot 17: Tip Sheet: "Biking Safely").

ANY QUESTIONS? LIST THEM HERE

Screen Shot 1: Home Page

NIHSeniorHealth Home Page with the Health Topics by First Letter and by Categories higlighted

Screen Shot 2: Health Topics A-Z Page

Health Topics A-Z page with the list of A - Z links highlighted

Screen Shot 3: Special Features

NIHSeniorHealth banner with the special features for resizing text and changing the color contrast highlighted

Change contrast special feature

Screen Shot 4: List of Links to Health Topics

List of links on the Health Topics A-Z page with Benefits of Exercise link highlighted

Screen Shot 5: Benefits of Exercise Topic

Benefits of Exercise Topic on the NIHSeniorHealth site

Screen Shot 6: Link to the National Institute on Aging Website

NIHSeniorHealth Health Benefits page with a link to the Naitonal Institute on Aging

Screen Shot 7: Home Page of the National Institute on Aging at NIH

Home page for the National Institute on Aging with the Go4Life link highlighted

Screen Shot 8: Go4Life Home Page

Go4Life Home Page with main navigation, sidebar, latest tweets and what's new highlighted

Screen Shot 9: "Get Started" Link and Drop Down Menu

Go4Life Get Started Link and Drop Down Menu

Screen Shot 10: Stay Safe Page

Go4Life Stay Safe Page with Printable Tools and Tips highlighted

Screen Shot 11: Four (4) types of Exercise

Go4Life Four tpes of Exercise page with left menu highlighted

Screen Shot 12: "Stay Active" Link and Drop Down Menu

Go4Life Stay Active drop down menu with Try These Exercises link highlighted

Screen Shot 13: Images of Strength Exercises

Strength Exercise Page with the Overhead Arm Raise image and link highlighted

Screen Shot 14: Overhead Arm Raise Page

Go4Life Overhead Arm Raise Page witht he Targeted muscles and the Video highlighted

Screen Shot 15: Success Stories Page

Go4Life Success Stories Page with the Stay Active Menu highlighted as well as the Read Full Story link

Screen Shot 16: List of Tip Sheets

List of Go4Life Tip Sheets

Screen Shot 17: Tip Sheet "Biking Safely"

Screen Shot of the Go4Life Tip Sheet on Biking Safely

Last reviewed: November 2013